Category Archives: Philosophical Theology

The World Poses the Question of God

Existence, whether it be the existence of the universe as a whole or our own personal existence, poses a question we cannot avoid. “Not how the world is,” Ludwig Wittgenstein observed, “but that it is, is the mystery.” Why? Why … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology | 1 Comment

Creatio ex Nihilo: The World Plus God is Not More Than God Alone

Diogenes Allen begins his book Philosophy for Understanding Theology¬†(1st ed.) with a chapter on the Christian doctrine of creation. One might initially think this an odd decision. When I ponder the theological use of philosophical conceptuality, I immediately think of … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

God is Different Because of the World

Norris Clarke is clear—he does not seek a repristination of the metaphysics of St Thomas Aquinas. He speaks, rather, of a “creative retrieval”; and some of his views can be pretty creative, at least by Thomist standards. Consider Clarke’s position … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology | 26 Comments

Analogy of Being: Knowing God in Similarity within Dissimilarity

How is it possible to speak meaningfully of the infinite and transcendent God? By definition he is not an object of our sensible, perhaps not even of our intellectual, experience; yet human language is grounded in our experience of the … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology | 2 Comments

Existence, Essence, and the One and the Many

The problem of the one and the many, writes Norris Clarke, “is the ultimate paradox of being and the deepest and the most fundamental problem of all metaphysics, of every intellectual effort to achieve a total, unified vision of all … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology | 8 Comments

The Diffusiveness of Being

“It is proper to every being, insofar as it is in act,” Norris Clarke writes, “to overflow into action, to act according to its nature, whether such action be free or necessitated in its modality” (Explorations in Metaphysics, p. 46). … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology

Action is the Revelation of Being

Action is the revelation of being. This principle, Norris Clarke tells us, is central to the metaphysics of St Thomas Aquinas. It also seems to be true. Try to imagine a non-acting being—an entity that never interacts with other entities, … Continue reading

Posted in Philosophical Theology