Tag Archives: determinism

God Makes Us Freely Acting

“We seem almost compelled,” remarks Hugh McCann, “to think there is some competition here: that when it comes to free will there is no way that both we and God can both have legitimate prerogatives, no way that one can … Continue reading

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The World is a Novel in the Mind of God

Can God determine our actions? One need not think more than a second or two.  Of course he can, we answer. If CIA brainwashers and television advertising can cause us to act in specific ways, then certainly God can. Let’s … Continue reading

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Freedom and Determinism: What’s the Difference?

Free agency, states Hugh McCann, exhibits three essential features. First, free actions cannot be “the product of independent event-causal conditions. An autonomous agent has to be a center of novelty—a point from which, to the extent he influences it, the … Continue reading

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Does God “respect” our freedom?

One often finds the following proposition asserted: God has created humanity as free beings and has thus bound himself not to interfere with their free decisions and choice. Divine agency and human agency are conceived as mutually exclusive. In one … Continue reading

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“Every instance of finite becoming or thought or desire subsists in the creature’s ‘ecstasy’ out of nonbeing into the infinite splendor of God”

What then, one might well ask, is divine providence? Certainly all Christians must affirm God’s transcendent governance of everything, even fallen history and fallen nature, and must believe that by that governance he will defeat evil and bring the final … Continue reading

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Thomas Talbott: The Inescapable Love of God (part 6)

God does not coerce! Without question, this is the most popular, and perhaps most powerful, objection raised against the universalist hope, at least in those circles where the retributive construal of damnation does not hold sway. God has given human … Continue reading

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