Category Archives: T. S. Eliot

Meditating Four Quartets: The Fire and the Rose are One

“Certainly there was an Eden on this very unhappy earth,” J. R. R. Tolkien wrote to his son Christopher in early 1945. “We all long for it, and we are constantly glimpsing it: our whole nature at its best and … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (V/3)

The moment of the rose and the moment of the yew-tree Are of equal duration. A people without history Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattern Of timeless moments. So, while the light fails On a winter’s … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (V/2)

We die with the dying; / See, they depart, and we go with them. / We are born with the dead: See, they return, and bring us with them. The first part of the verse is striking but not surprising. … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (V)

Fifth Movement What we call the beginning is often the end / And to make an end is to make a beginning. / The end is where we start from. February 2014—I began with Burnt Norton. Of course. One begins … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (IV)

. 29 May 1940 was a frightening day for the men awaiting evacuation at Malo-les-Bains beach. Hundreds were killed while waiting for evacuation. Multiple rescue ships were destroyed by the Luftwaffe. “The destroyers pumped shells into the air, and disappeared … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (III/2)

Sin is Behovely, but / All shall be well, and / All manner of thing shall be well. When I read these lines last May, I knew that I had to stop blogging on Little Gidding and read the Showings of Julian … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (III)

Third Movement There are three conditions which often look alike / Yet differ completely, flourish in the same hedgerow: / Attachment to self and to things and to persons, detachment / From self and from things and from persons; and, … Continue reading

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