Category Archives: T. S. Eliot

Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (II/3)

I said: ‘The wonder that I feel is easy, / Yet ease is cause of wonder. Therefore speak: / I may not comprehend, may not remember.’ / And he: ‘I am not eager to rehearse / My thoughts and theory … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (II/2)

“I thought morning would never get here,” whispers the poet to himself as he steps out of his house to survey the new devastation wrought by the latest wave of German bombers. What he sees sickens him. He finds himself … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (II)

The Second Movement A single theme, three stanzas, each containing four couplets, mildly irregular meter. The irregular meter must be intentional. A poet as accomplished as T. S. Eliot could easily have conformed the lyrics to the traditional form. Perhaps … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (I/3)

If you came this way, / Taking any route, starting from anywhere, / At any time or at any season, / It would always be the same: you would have to put off / Sense and notion. You are not … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding (I/2)

If you came this way, / Taking the route you would be likely to take / From the place you would be likely to come from, / If you came this way in may time, you would find the hedges … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: Little Gidding

First Movement Midwinter spring is its own season / Sempiternal though sodden towards sundown, / Suspended in time, between pole and tropic. / When the short day is brightest, with frost and fire, / The brief sun flames the ice, … Continue reading

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Meditating Four Quartets: The Dry Salvages (V)

To communicate with Mars, converse with spirits, / To report the behaviour of the sea monster, / Describe the horoscope, haruspicate or scry, / Observe disease in signatures, evoke / Biography from the wrinkles of the palm / And tragedy … Continue reading

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